Bram Stoker’s house, 15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf, Dublin 3, hosts ‘THE ALUCARD CODE’, a collaborative exhibition by artists Vera McEvoy and Frances Nolan on 6th June 2013 , with an opening address by Dr. Declan Long, Turner Prize 2013 Jurist and Lecturer.

There is an abiding fascination with the house in which Bram Stoker, author of Dracula, was born. Despite attempts in 2012 to persuade the State to purchase the house and turn it into a Dracula museum, it is again in private ownership. Presently, the house has been stripped of almost all non-original additions and is in an in-between state awaiting renovation sympathetic to its Georgian origins. It therefore offers a unique opportunity to contemplate its imaginary and actual past and its possible future.

Dracula is the father of all vampire books, films and TV series, with millions of fans worldwide. The novel covers topics that are still of great relevance today, such as consumerism, technology, obsolescence, gender roles, sexuality, and work. As a result, it is of great interest to a range of academics, historians, literary experts and artists.

Artists Vera McEvoy and Frances Nolan are NCAD graduates of Fine Art Printmaking and Painting respectively, but their practices are diverse, sharing a fascination with the old and the discarded, and the remnants of past lives that live on in dwellings, workplaces and objects. They have created a subtle collaborative intervention in Bram Stoker’s house that respects its historic significance but also raises topical questions about how we negotiate and imagine such burdened spaces.

Shreds, ALUCARD Code, due exhibition

Shreds 2013 by Vera McEvoy, exhibited June 2013. Birthplace of Bram Stoker, 15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf, Dublin 3. Re-processed wallpapers in Ogham. Dim.h.280cm x w. 56cm. Exhibited as part of the ALUCARD Code, duo exhibition with Frances Nolan.

 

Weird Sisters, wire and nails from floor boards. Alucard Code 2013

 

Chapter 3 by Frances Nolan. Dimensions h.160cm x w 280cm

For video view here and for essay on the exhibition click here